Monthly Archives: February 2013

Contemporary social theory updates Parsons’ AGIL model

(More theoretical drivel . . . ) The AGIL model today From the the 1930s to the 1970s, Talcott Parsons set forth a theory of sociological intelligence by (a) interpreting Max Weber for US sociology, and (b) defining the analytical … Continue reading

Posted in advanced capitalism, Jurgen Habermas, sociology, Symbolic data, theoretical drivel, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

A qualitative sociological economics, from the point of view of the actors involved

(Some theoretical drivel . . .) In the field of knowledge immediately shaping the construction of a qualitative sociological economics (methodologically conducted from the point of view of the actors involved), a major breakthrough was Bernanke’s call to analytically focus … Continue reading

Posted in advanced capitalism, qualitative sociology of economics and politics, sociology of business, theoretical drivel | Leave a comment

Four reasons for economic optimism in 2013, 2014, and beyond

The case for US economic optimism in 2013, 2014, and beyond continues to grow. Here are four reasons for optimism (with limits to the optimism in parentheses): 1. US oil boom (on the other hand, there is a possibility we … Continue reading

Posted in an actually thriving labor market, conservative movement, economic recovery, macro-economics, money and finance | Leave a comment

Six reasons US will remain world’s preeminent monetary power for years to come

Recently I wrote that I see the US “continuing as unrivaled monetary power today and into the future.” Here is an excerpt from A. Gary Shilling, writing at Bloomberg, listing six reasons to be so optimistic about the US as … Continue reading

Posted in 2007-2012, advanced capitalism, economic recovery, macro-economics, money and finance, the great contraction, the great contraction 2007-2012 | Leave a comment

On designed activities: a comment on Keynesian economics from the point of view of a qualitative sociological economics

The following is a position on Keynesian economics, fiscal stimulus, and aggregate economic demand, from the point of view of a qualitative sociological macro-economics, held with little to medium confidence: Under the current circumstances, I remain an advocate of fiscal … Continue reading

Posted in economic recovery, macro-economics, money and finance, money velocity, qualitative sociology of economics and politics, sociology, sociology of business | 2 Comments