Monthly Archives: September 2013

We now better account for intellectual property and intangible assets

On July 31, 2013, the Bureau of Economic Analysis revised the way it measures GDP, with the goal first and foremost “to better measure the effects of innovation and intangible assets on the economy.” Specifically, this means, among other things, … Continue reading

Posted in accounting, advanced capitalism, intangible assets, intellectual property, macro-economics, prices, qualitative sociology of economics and politics, sociology, the database, the price mechanism | Leave a comment

What is at stake and why GOP is irresponsible to put debt-default on the table

It is time to envision possible scenarios resulting from a failure to raise the debt ceiling. At this point I don’t find it likely that such a breach will happen. I still find it most likely that, after weeks of … Continue reading

Posted in 2007-2012, economic recovery, money and finance, political sociology, politics, qualitative sociology of economics and politics, sociology, The End of the GOP, the great contraction, the great contraction 2007-2012 | Leave a comment

Ryan Lizza details the GOP “suicide caucus”

There is a reason GOP strategists and those interested in growing the party’s intellectual, cultural, and social capital oppose the Ted Cruz-led attempt to force the defunding of the Affordable Care Act. Sure, maybe some people actually support the law … Continue reading

Posted in democracy, intangible assets, political sociology, politics, qualitative sociology of economics and politics | Leave a comment

On the political sociology of Samuel Huntington

Twenty years ago, in the Summer of 1993, the esteemed and controversial political scientist Samuel Huntington published his famous essay, “The Clash of Civilizations?” His thesis had two parts. First, It is my hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict … Continue reading

Posted in democracy, political sociology, politics, sociology, Uncategorized, war is conservative? | Leave a comment

COLUMN: debt-default politics must end

As the previous decade was coming to a turbulent close, James Fallows, the veteran journalist, penned a trio of important articles. The first, “The $1.4 Trillion Question,” published in January 2008, was among the first to look at the rising … Continue reading

Posted in 2007-2012, debt, economic recovery, macro-economics, money and finance, political sociology, politics, qualitative sociology of economics and politics, the great contraction, the great contraction 2007-2012 | Leave a comment

COLUMN: The GOP domestic vision

Elizabeth Drew’s essay in the current New York Review of Books expounds upon the consequences of America’s ever-shifting electorate. In 2012, roughly 130 million voters turned out, around 58 percent of those eligible. Two years earlier, in 2010, without the … Continue reading

Posted in advanced capitalism, an actually thriving labor market, conservative movement, democracy, economic recovery, political sociology, politics, The End of the GOP, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

COLUMN: US averts war, Russia gives up an ally

Last week, the same day the Bashar al-Assad-Charlie Rose interview aired, in which Assad chucklingly denied knowledge of Syria’s chemical weapon stockpile, US Secretary of State John Kerry declared out loud that if Syria turned over its entire stockpile to … Continue reading

Posted in political sociology, politics, war is conservative? | Leave a comment