Category Archives: an actually thriving labor market

Three days till debt-ceiling breach

What would it take to foster an actually thriving domestic labor market? What kind of political and policy relationship between government and private industry would it take? I am of the mind these questions, or variants of them, should represent … Continue reading

Posted in 2007-2012, an actually thriving labor market, democracy, economic recovery, political sociology, politics, qualitative sociology of economics and politics, The End of the GOP, the great contraction, the great contraction 2007-2012 | Leave a comment

Four days till debt-ceiling breach

What do you need to know about US politics? How about this: The policies it would take to foster an actually thriving labor market are not on the table. But unprovoked debt default is. The Republicans are no longer interested … Continue reading

Posted in 2007-2012, an actually thriving labor market, political sociology, politics, qualitative sociology of economics and politics, The End of the GOP, the great contraction, the great contraction 2007-2012 | Leave a comment

The budget is the actual issue at stake

The Republicans aren’t going to goad Obama into defunding Obamacare. The Democrats aren’t going to magically “break the fever” and get Republicans to see the error of their anti-government ways. Neither of these goals is at this point remotely on … Continue reading

Posted in 2007-2012, an actually thriving labor market, democracy, economic recovery, macro-economics, political sociology, politics, the great contraction, the great contraction 2007-2012 | Leave a comment

COLUMN: The GOP domestic vision

Elizabeth Drew’s essay in the current New York Review of Books expounds upon the consequences of America’s ever-shifting electorate. In 2012, roughly 130 million voters turned out, around 58 percent of those eligible. Two years earlier, in 2010, without the … Continue reading

Posted in advanced capitalism, an actually thriving labor market, conservative movement, democracy, economic recovery, political sociology, politics, The End of the GOP, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

the problem of middle-class spending power: a few comments

The last five years we have witnessed a historic de-leveraging in the private sector. This process was part of a large economic contraction overall. The collective response was (a) creative and explosive monetary expansion combined with (b) politicized fiscal standoff. … Continue reading

Posted in 2007-2012, an actually thriving labor market, debt, money and finance, money velocity, politics, prices, the great contraction, the great contraction 2007-2012 | Leave a comment

Bartlett on fiscal stimulus when faced with a “liquidity trap”

Bruce Bartlett has a post at the New York Times’ “Economix” blog titled “Keynes’ Biggest Mistake” (link). In it Bartlett asks, “Does Keynesian economics completely ignore the long run?” His answer: No, but the title of Keynes’ famous book — … Continue reading

Posted in 2007-2012, an actually thriving labor market, debt, economic recovery, macro-economics, qualitative sociology of economics and politics, the great contraction, the great contraction 2007-2012 | Leave a comment

COLUMN: fiscal contraction amid monetary expansion

Is the US economy miraculously growing, despite significant fiscal contraction? Or is the US economic recovery remarkably flat, given the multi-year run of historically unprecedented monetary expansion? Can the answer be both? Neither? In a post at The Atlantic, Derek … Continue reading

Posted in 2007-2012, an actually thriving labor market, debt, economic recovery, macro-economics, qualitative sociology of economics and politics, the great contraction, the great contraction 2007-2012 | 1 Comment